Faculty Profile

Joanna  Dobroszycki, MDJoanna Dobroszycki, MD
Phone: 718-918-4667
E-mail: joanna03@earthlink.net

Dr. Dobroszycki is an Attending in the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. Dr. Dobroszycki is board-certified in Pediatric Infectious Diseases and she is an Associate Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.

Undergraduate School:

Barnard College
Columbia University

Medical School:

Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Training:

  • Internship and Residency: Montefiore Medical Center
  • Infectious Disease Fellowship: Montefiore Medical Center

Bibliography:

  • Farmakiotis D, Varughese J, Dobroszycki J, at al. Typhoid Fever in an inner city hospital: a 5-year retrospective review. J Travel Med. 2013 Jan-Feb;20(1):17-21.
  • Munjal I, Dobroszycki J, Rosenberg MG, Wiznia AA, Abadi J, et al . Impact of HIV-1 infection and pregnancy on maternal health: comparison between perinatally and behaviorally infected young women. Adolesc Health Med Ther. 2013 Feb 21;4:51-8.
  • Sharp ER, Abadi J, Dobroszycki J, Wiznia AA, Rosenberg MG, et al. Association of differentiation state of CD4+ T cells and disease progression in HIV-1 perinatally infected children. PLoS One.2012;7(1):e29154.
  • Sharp ER, Abadi J, Dobroszycki J, Wiznia AA, Rosenberg MG, at al. Immunodominance of HIV-1 specific CD8+ T-cell responses is related to disease progression rate in vertically infected adolescents. PLoS One. 2011;6(7):e21135.
  • Dobroszycki J, Abadi J, Wiznia AA, Rosenberg MG. Profile of darunavir in the treatment of HIV-infected pediatric and adolescent patients. Adolesc Health Med Ther. 2011 Sep 14;2:85-93.
  • Abadi J, Rosenberg MG, Dobroszycki J, Wiznia A, et al. Partial treatment interruption of protease inhibitor-based highly active antiretroviral therapy regimens in HIV-infected children. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2006 Mar;41(3):298-303.

Publications

  • Liu G, Fennelly G, Kazacos KR, Grose C, Dobroszycki J, Saffra N, Coyle CM, Weiss LM, Szlechter MM, Tanowitz HB. Baylisascaris procyonis and Herpes Simplex Virus 2 coinfection presenting as ocular larva migrans with granuloma formation in a child. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015 Sep;93(3):612-4.