Faculty Profile

Elizabeth Worley, MD
E-mail: elizabeth.farman-farmaian@nychhc.org

Dr. Worley is an attending physician in the pediatric ambulatory clinic and is an Assistant Professor of Clinical Pediatrics at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. In 2004, Dr. Worley moved to London where she earned a Master’s of science in public health from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. She then joined Stanford University School of Medicine as an attending physician in the Division of Adolescent Medicine. Dr. Worley has served as a medical consultant to India Partners, a US based NGO, and has worked on numerous public health projects in Macedonia, Kosovo, India and Honduras.

She is currently the Director of Reach Out and Read at Jacobi, a program that she started, among the many contributions she has made to the department, that encourages early language development and literacy. She has also written numerous articles as a columnist for WebMD. Dr. Worley raises funding to distribute more than 30,000 books to at risk children each year and spearheaded a project to design and build a playground in the Pediatric Ambulatory Care Clinic.

Undergraduate School:

Williams College

Medical School:

Pennsylvania School of Medicine

Training:

  • Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Bibliography:

  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Aspirin for Kids.”  WebMD, November, 2000.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Into the Mouths of Babes.”  WebMD, July, 2000.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “When a Kid Won’t Drink Milk.”  WebMD, June, 2000.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Tempering Tantrums.”  WebMD, February, 2000.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Contagious Creepy Crawlies: Although pinworms are not as common in the U.S. as in other parts of the world, they are still prevalent among young children and their parents.”  WebMD, February 2000.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “A Soft Spot for Baby: When babies are born, their skull bones have not yet fused. This incomplete closure benefits newborns by allowing them to squeeze more easily through the birth canal, and it later accommodates brain growth.” WebMD, January, 2000.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Kids and Coins.” WebMD, January, 2000.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Time for Tubes?”  WebMD, 2000.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., ”Dropping Games.”  WebMD, 2000.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “The War Ends, But Death Takes No Holiday.” The
     Observer Reporter, Sept. 26, 1999. pB7.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Modern Medicine Can’t Cure All Ills in Kosovo.” The
     Observer Reporter, Sept. 19, 1999.  pB9.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Kosovo Hospital Viewed with Healthy Distrust.” The
     Observer Reporter, Sept. 12, 1999.  pB5.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “A Bird’s Eye View of War’s Casualties and Survivors.” The
     Observer Reporter, Sept. 5, 1999.  pB5.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “A Day in a Life in Kosovo.” The
     Observer Reporter, Aug. 29, 1999.  pB5.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Healing the Wounds of War.” The Observer Reporter,
    Aug. 22, 1999. pB7. 
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Hello from Tetova.” Oxygen.com, 1999.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Hello from Skopje.”  Oxygen.com, 1999.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Hello from Kosovo.”  Oxygen.com, 1999.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Hello from Vushtrri.”  Oxygen.com, 1999.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Hello from the Pristina Airport.”  Oxygen.com, 1999.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Still in Kosovo.”  Oxygen.com, 1999.
  • Worley, Elizabeth, M. D., “Coming Home Soon.”  Oxygen.com, 1999.

Other:

  • American Academy of Pediatrics
  • Council on Foreign Relations